How to Get an Animal Out of a Crawlspace

Crawlspaces under homes provide solid protection from the weather and room for wild animals to live. Having animals live in your crawlspace can lead to problems and could make it harder to remove them as time goes on. When you suspect you have unwanted visitors staying in your crawlspace, you can rely on professional wildlife removal services to get rid of them. Learn why animals choose crawlspaces as homes and how to remove them and prevent them from living in yours. Why Are Crawlspaces Attractive to Wild Animals? When you have wild animals living under your house, you may wonder why they specifically chose the crawlspace. Many wild animals take comfort in crawlspaces because they offer shelter from the elements and can maintain moderate temperatures during the seasons, whether it's summer or winter. Crawlspaces also safeguard animals from predators, so they feel safe staying in a protected shelter. While crawlspaces offer many benefits for wildlife, it's important to avoid letting them live in yours to...
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How to Prevent Raccoons: 5 Ways to Keep Raccoons Away from Your House

If you feel like your encounters with raccoons have become increasingly common, you’re not alone. Though raccoons were once confined to the rural areas closer to their natural habitats of forests and wetlands, recent decades have seen a great raccoon migration to urban and suburban areas increasingly farther from their ancestral homes. This shift in habitat has been anything but detrimental to raccoon populations. Zoologist Sam Zeveloff estimates the North American raccoon population grew between 15-20 fold from the 1930s to the 1980s and is still on the rise, especially in urban and suburban areas where the creatures were once less common. In this article, we discuss ways to identify raccoon-related property damage if you’ve yet to spot these unwanted visitors and ways to keep raccoons away from your home. We'll also cover why raccoons are thriving in residential environments, so you can better prevent raccoons in the first place. Why Are Raccoons in Cities and Suburbs? One of the best methods to prevent raccoons is to...
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Raccoons in Your Attic: What Do You Do?

  Raccoons in Your Attic: What Do You Do? Since most animals instinctively seek warmth and shelter, it's no surprise local wildlife might invite themselves into your home at unexpected times. Having a raccoon in the attic is a typical occurrence for many homeowners, and worth taking seriously. There are a few tips and tricks to follow if you want to try to remove the raccoons on your own, or you can call a full-service company to handle the entire process and remove the risk from yourself. Table of Contents: Signs of Raccoons in Your Attic Damage Raccoons Can Cause What to Do if You Find a Raccoon in Your Home Signs of Raccoons in Your Attic While raccoons can be sneaky, there are a few ways to tell if one is living in your attic unwelcomed. These small signs can help you assess whether you have a raccoon problem, and where they might be getting in. Based on the severity of the indications, you...
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How Does an Animal Get Into My House?

An animal may get into your house through the openings in your roof, attic, chimney, crawlspace or basement. If you suspect an animal has gotten in, inspect your interior and exterior property for signs of wildlife activity, such as chew marks, grease stains, droppings, or damage. A professional wildlife removal company can help you deal with the animals in your home through exclusion techniques. Explore the animals that can get into your house to determine how to deal with any potential intruders. Request Wildlife Removal Services ➔ Main Entry Points Depending on the animal's size, their entry points into your home don't need to be large. Check the following places for signs of wildlife in your home: Crawlspace or Basement: Animals enjoy hiding in dry, dark basements. You can determine if wildlife is in this part of your home by checking the foundation from the outside. Pay attention to gaps, such as places where different types of building material meet or where cables, pipes...
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